Tag Archives: Hashimoto’s

Moving On

I can’t believe it’s taken me a week to sit down and update since my post-op follow up appointment!

I’ll start there…

First of all, the path report on the left side of my thyroid was cancer free.  Woo hoo, right?  So was the lymph node that he removed.  Dr. B offered me the option of a referral to the nuclear medicine doctor, but he and I both felt that I didn’t really need RAI ablation/treatment, so we are just going to skip it for now.  Double woo hoo!

The other side of my thyroid did have some weird stuff…for one, it had a LOT of nodules, which I knew, and “hurthle cell change,” which I was pretty sure they would find.  They also found some “giant” cells, which can be associated with Hashimoto’s (which I have–or had?), but also has an association with PTC and even Anaplastic cancer.

I was a little afraid ahead of time that if no cancer was found in this second surgery that I would regret having it done….but I don’t.  I just know with all the weird stuff that was in there that I would have required a lot of monitoring to stay on top of it, and I feel, myself, that some of that would have morphed into more cancer at some point.  No, I’m just glad it’s out, and that we know for sure there wasn’t any cancer there.  If it had stayed in there, I would have wondered forEVER.  I have this feeling like I am “clean” now.

Dr. B does want me to have a WBS (Whole Body Scan–they use a small “tracer” dose of RAI) to check for any possible metastasis, but I get the sense that it is just kind of a formality, just to make extra, extra sure. That will be at either 6 months or a year, I can’t remember which.  Beyond that, I will have my thyroglobulin  levels tracked.  (That’s a protein only made my thyroid cells.)  As long as they stay stable, it’s unlikely that cancer has returned.  And I will also have periodic neck ultrasounds to make sure there’s nothing abnormal springing up in the thyroid bed.  But that’s it.  Nothing more than a low-level annoyance, if things go as expected.

I am so, SO thankful that God has seen fit to give us a favorable answer.  I look around at others who are going through so much more right now–one college friend who just had a kidney transplant, another whose four-year-old daughter is in a battle with leukemia that could last for years, another whose younger brother has just learned he has stage IV, terminal stomach cancer.  I feel like I have gotten off pretty easy.

I am also SO grateful for all the kindness we have been shown.  I have gotten so many cards from people.  Our brothers and sisters in Christ are STILL bringing us food to help us out.  Jessica stayed with me overnight in the hospital AGAIN.  I could go on and on.  I LOVE being part of God’s family.  His children are the best siblings I could ask for.

I am also doing pretty well so far on my thyroid medication.  More about that next time!

Today is Mom’s birthday.  I bought some Mayfield Brown Cow Jr. ice cream pops at Publix to celebrate.  She used to always have them when her grandkids–my kids and Nathan’s–came to visit.  She called them “Cow Bars,” and that’s how my kids know them now.

I miss her SO much, but in many ways, the intense, sharp pain of her loss has faded.  She’s been gone just over three years now.  Happy Birthday, Mom!  I raise my Cow Bar in salute.

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Vitamin D, Naps, and Nursing

There may be a connection…but that’s not where I’m headed. :)

First…I got my Vitamin D levels checked after learning that Hashimoto’s is linked with low Vitamin D.  My levels came back as 23.3 ng/mL, which is considered “insufficient.”  Deficient would be anything below 20, and “good” levels are anything from 30-100.  So I got me some good Vitamin D3 supplements to take. I found a good deal on Vitamin Code D3 with probiotics on Amazon. Is it possible that I feel better after only 3 days?

Weaning is….going.  We’re making some progress.  The beach idea did NOT work out.  It was not pretty, people.   But yesterday I just decided that we were GOING to do this.  I picked out four books that I thought she would like and told her they were “nap time” books.  I basically tried to mimic her successful bed time routine.  We read the books, then I put her in bed with her lullaby CD on, and I sat on the end of her bed.  Day 1, Wednesday, it took 2.5 hours from the time we sat down to read until she fell asleep. I was DETERMINED not to leave that room until she fell asleep.  Day 2 was today, and it took one hour from start to finish. I am praying that it continues to get easier over the next several days.

I need to decide if I should cut out her morning nursing before surgery, if I should let surgery be the thing that ends the morning feed, or if I should continue it for a little while after surgery.

Part of making that decision will be how well she is doing with the change in her nap routine over the next few days.  I also need to find out how soon it would be safe to nurse after having general anesthesia, and how pain meds will affect things too. I don’t want Eleanor to be stressed by weaning too fast at the same time that her access to me is going to be limited by my surgery and recovery. Also, if I quit the same day as my operation, I will probably have to deal with engorgement for a day or two at the same time that I’m recovering from surgery. Not fun.  So I have lots of factors to consider.

Tomorrow is one week until surgery.  Y texted me and asked if she could put it in the church bulletin on Sunday.  My first though was, that’s kind of early, isn’t it?  Then I realized it was going to be less than a week before my surgery.  So I let her do it.  It really is almost here.

Mama the Grouch

I think Rusty is worried that I’m going to be Grouchy Mommy (or possibly worse, Weepy Mommy) after my thyroid surgery.  He keeps making lighthearted comments to that effect.  One example:  I was telling him that I was thinking about giving up coffee. He joked something to the effect of “No coffee AND no thyroid? Is that a good idea?”

Now, it’s very possible that he’s just trying to keep things light.  However, in my experience, there is always some truth at the bottom of humor.

To be perfectly fair, I am a little concerned about how I will feel with only half a functioning thyroid, and that half possibly impaired by an autoimmune process.  But I feel like with a little thyroid hormone replacement, I will probably be able to sort it out.

Google remission for several days now.  I feel much better.  Just waiting for June 7th.

Everything you’ve always wanted to know about Hurthle Cells

T minus 2 days until my follow-up appointment with Dr. B. I wanted to compile a summary of what I’ve learned about Hurthle Cells and “Hurthle Cell Lesions,” because I know from experience that although all of this info is really fresh in my mind right now, I will forget it.  And it will be convenient to have it all here in one stash.  I’d like to make a disclaimer ahead of time, just in case this blog ever goes live:  I am not a doctor, or a scientist.  What follows is my understanding based on the research I have done over the past two weeks.  (If two weeks isn’t long enough to make me an expert on Abnormal Cells of the Thyroid, what would be?)

Hurthle Cells are, by definition, abnormal.  From what I have read, there are some theories about why they form, but no one knows for sure. One of the main theories is that they are follicular cells that have transformed due to stress.   They are frequently (some say always) seen in Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, a condition in which the body’s immune system starts attacking the thyroid gland for unknown reasons. They are extra large and full of lots more than normal mitochondria, which gives them a grainy appearance under the microscope.  The mechanism for apoptosis–the process by which abnormal cells know they are abnormal and cause themselves to self-destruct, doesn’t seem to work for Hurthle cells.  Also, unlike most other cells in the thyroid, most Hurthle cells (most sources say around 90%) have lost their ability to take up iodine, which means that RAI isn’t usually effective against Hurthle cell cancers.  On the other hand, theydo produce Thyroglobulin, which makes this a useful marker for recurrence in Hurthle cell cancers, but only if the thyroid is completely removed by surgery and completely nuked by RAI.  Ok, that’s it!

Actually, there is some information about biochemical processes and genetic mutations that I haven’t absorbed yet.  I’m not convinced I need to know all that stuff, since I don’t plan on doing any clinical research on Hurthle Cells.

A “Hurthle Cell Lesion,” what I have, is a group of Hurthle Cells that have all decided to hang out together in one part of the thyroid gland.  If the lesion is composed of more than 75% Hurthle cells, and it’s encapsulated with a distinct border separating it from the rest of the gland, it’s called a “neoplasm,” or tumor.

So here’s the thing.  They can tell from FNA (Fine Needle Aspiration) if the lump/nodule/lesion is composed of mostly Hurthle Cells.  I think they can tell from ultrasound if it’s encapsulated (this is one thing I want to ask about at my appointment on Tuesday).  But they can’t tell if it’s cancer (carcinoma) or not (adenoma) without taking it out.  That’s because most Hurthle cell tumors and lesions just sit there, doing mostly nothing. They aren’t aggressive, they don’t try to proselytize or set up colonies in other parts of the body.  The only way to tell the difference between a benign Hurthle Cell tumor (adenoma) and a malignant one (carcinoma) is to take it out and dissect it, to see if it’s trying to invade the rest of the thyroid through the capsule wall (capsular invasion) or if it’s trying to invade the blood stream (vascular invasion).  If it is doing either (or both) of those things, it’s classified as cancer, or “Hurthle Cell Carcinoma.”  (HCC)

Hurthle Cell Carcinomas tend to occur in people over 50 (not me) with nodules larger than 4 cm (also not me) who do not have inflammation–like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (also not me, since I DO have inflammation).  So all of those things are WAY in my favor. Yay!  Their prognosis is not as good as for people who have Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC, also known as “the good cancer,” because of its amazingly high cure rate) or Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma (FTC, only slightly less “good” than PTC), but some people feel that this has more to do with the fact that it usually occurs in an older population than with the actual characteristics of HCC.

Here’s something else.  Hurthle Cell Carcinomas are really, really rare.  So rare that when you go looking for info about Hurthle Cell cancers, because your doctor did a biopsy on your thyroid and found Hurthle Cells, and you are freaking out, trying to figure out what on earth a Hurthle cell is and if you should be worried or not, what you will mostly find is scholarly journal articles.  Maybe a few posts on message boards.

The books about thyroid problems and even about thyroid cancers might have a sentence or two about friendly Hurthle Cells and their malicious carcinoma counterparts.  Maybe even up to a paragraph.  What they will mostly say is that Hurthle Cell Carcinomas are like Follicular Carcinomas, except that they don’t usually take up RAI, and they tend to metastasize more aggressively.

Those bloggers and memoirists (is that even a word?) who write about their thyroid cancer journeys almost all have Papillary Carcinoma (PTC), because 75-80% of thyroid cancers are Papillary.  I might have found one person with a thyroid cancer story whose thyroid cancer was of a Hurthle cell variety.  I’m actually about to go see if I can find that blog again… ETA:  I did find that blog by the guy I thought had HCC, but he didn’t; he had PTC.  But I also found this guy, who has written a very nice blog about his HCC journey.

Ok, so there are probably a few more details that I could cram in here (PTC variants, etc.), but I am not sure I could do them justice.  If you want to read a scholarly article that covers all of this and more in some detail, try this one.  I have found it to be pretty comprehensive, and I’ve actually printed it out to put in my file with my test results and other paperwork.  You can also get lots of useful articles by googling terms like “Hurthle Cell Adenoma,” “Hurthle Cell Lesion,” and “Hurthle Cell Neoplasm.”