The next thing I remember…

Surgery went really well. My nurses were all super sweet. And it wasn’t crowded or backed up like I thought it would be. W, C, P, and J came and hung out with Rusty while I was in surgery. I was so glad he didn’t have to sit in the waiting room alone.

In preop, they got me situated–stripped, gowned, I.V.’d, etc– and then called Rusty back to be with me. We hung out while they gave me my first and second dose of sedative. I don’t remember much after that…Rusty says he kissed me as I left.

I have a foggy memory of them shifting me to the operating table.  After that, the next thing I remember a nurse in post op saying, “It’s all done, and it’s benign!”

That’s the only thing that has bothered me about the whole process. To be told, “It’s benign,” the instant I wake up, when really, we won’t know that until final pathology is done, seems PROFOUNDLY irresponsible. It wasn’t the nurse’s fault. She was repeating what she’d been told.

Dr. B was also very positive when he spoke with Rusty after surgery. Which was fine, given that surgery went so well. But he basically led Rusty to believe that all worries are over. And I hope they are, but I won’t be able to rest completely easy until that final report is back.

I wanted to talk to Dr. B myself to see if there was something he saw during surgery that led him to believe that all worries were over, like maybe if the Hurthle cell lesion was unencapsulated, which would suggest benign metaplasia. Fortunately, he came by to see me this morning, so I got my chance.

Just as I thought, when he said, “benign,” what he meant was no malignancy found on the frozen section samples during surgery. Then he told me they were 90% accurate.  Which is misleading. Because when they find malignancy in a Hurthle cell or follicular neoplasm, frozen section testing is very accurate. But for those two kinds of thyroid lesions, frozen section analysis has only a 20-40% sensitivity. That means that it fails to catch 60-80% of malignancies.

That’s because frozen section testing only looks at a few samples from the tumor, and if there is capsular or vascular invasion at even one point, the lesion is malignant. I’m not even sure why they do it, to be honest.

So I asked Dr. B if it was encapsulated, and he said that it looked like it, but he only final pathology will tell for sure. Which is what I thought. I just hate that we probably got some people’s hopes up prematurely. But maybe those hopes will be fulfilled, and they need never be the wiser.

So the words we are hoping for now are “Hurthle cell adenoma.”

My dear friend J stayed all night with me. We were able to catch up, and she pampered me, rubbing my calves where they were sore from the compression stockings they used during surgery.

The boys, of course did fine with Aunt Sharon, and so did Eleanor, for which I was SO thankful. She slept late yesterday morning, which made it possible to skip her nap, completely avoiding that sticky wicket. Then because she was sleepy, bedtime was a breeze.  And getting up this morning she was a little sensitive, but got through it ok.

She has not nursed all day, although she has asked a time or two since I’ve been home. I wonder if I’ll be able to just cruise on out and be done with it. The morning will be the test, I think.

I am so thankful to the Lord for helping things go so well. And also for all the good friends and family he has blessed me with, who have helped me and prayed for me through it all. May all our prayers be answered with a benign final result.

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