Waiting for a Biopsy

I couldn’t quit wondering what the ultrasound report said. I knew that certain characteristics were more indicative of malignancy. I called Dr. G’s office back and asked if they could print out a copy of my blood work results and the ultrasound report. I went by and picked it up.

While I was there, I asked if it was ever possible to talk to Dr. G without making an appointment. I explained that waiting so long for my results had caused me a lot of anxiety—that I felt like I didn’t matter—and that I just wanted to talk to him about it. I was trying really hard not to embarrass myself by crying. As always, the women at the desk were extremely kind, and said they would leave a note for him to call me when he had a chance.

The lab work truly did look “normal.” Most of my levels were close to the middle of the normal range. My FT4 was at the low end of normal, but my TSH–which is what they use to determine if you are hyper- or hypo-thyroid–was right on target. The ultrasound report was very short. What I learned was that I had a lot of nodules, including three larger ones—one in the left lobe, one in the right lobe, and one on the isthmus in the center. That, I figured out, must be the one I had discovered. It sounded like the one in the right lobe was the most concerning—it had “areas of calcification.” The radiologist who had written the report recommended a biopsy.

“Areas of calcification” didn’t help me out much. I had read that microcalcifications strongly suggested papillary cancer, but “coarse” calcifications didn’t necessarily, and a calcified “halo,” or “eggshell,” as it was called, actually pointed to the lump’s being benign. The report didn’t even mention the size of the more worrisome lump, though it offered measurements on two others. I would just have to wait on more details.

The woman who had given me the call had said that I would probably hear from Dr. B’s office on Thursday. I didn’t.

I did get to meet with my ladies’ Bible study group though, and I shared with them about my thyroid nodules and upcoming biopsy. As always, it was a huge comfort to know those women would be added to the number of people who were praying for me. Y also told me that I was the third person in a short period of time who had been concerned about suspicious thyroid nodules. That was comforting too.

Thursday also brought a call from Dr. G. To be honest, I was a little embarrassed when I actually had him on the phone. I told him simply about the anxiety I had experienced while I had waited for my call-back on the ultrasound. He was very kind. He also told me about being gone for a long weekend right after the report got to his office, and about some of the nightmare issues they had been having at the new office. He had come back from his vacation to an office that smelled like a latrine because the sewer line was backed up—it was filled with concrete. And he’d been battling other problems related to the new building. It sounded like a nightmare of a week.

“I don’t want to make excuses, because I hate it when someone makes excuses to me,” he said. But it helped me a lot to know that there had been extenuating circumstances. I really felt for him, and I told him so. I also told him that I really didn’t want to be a complainer or a “problem patient.” I hope I’m not on the “bad” list for him and his staff now.

Friday brought no call from Dr. B’s office. Is there a pattern here? I thought. I decided to resign myself to the fact that this was going to be a long, drawn-out process.

Over the weekend I found a blog by a thyroid cancer patient. I have always been someone who can face things better if I know what to expect. I fully realized that my odds of having thyroid cancer were small, but I needed to keep reassuring myself that if I did, the path forward was doable.

In this blog, the writer, a young man in his twenties, outlined his entire cancer journey from discovery of a lump during an MRI for something else through his post-cancer recovery years later. One thing I found interesting was that the doctor who handled his surgery was an ENT. That made me feel better about going to Dr. B. It seems like even though the steps taken on this journey are pretty standardized, they can be carried out by doctors in several different specialties.

On Sunday we gathered with our brothers and sisters in Christ to worship. B, a long time friend, lead a prayer in which he asked for God to help those who were undergoing diagnostic tests, and for the results they received to be accurate. He doesn’t know it, but he’s praying for me, I thought.

On Monday, I decided to call Dr. G’s office just to make sure that I was supposed to be waiting for Dr. B’s office to call me, and that I was not supposed to call them. The receptionist told me that the referral had been sent, and that I should hear something soon. I did. Later that morning, someone from Dr. B’s office called and apologized for it taking so long for them to call me. She was training someone new and had gotten backed up. I had the feeling that Dr. G’s office had checked in with her to prompt the call.

I told her that I was being sent to Dr. B because I needed a biopsy of some thyroid nodules. She said that I would have to do a consultation appointment first. I wasn’t thrilled with the delay, but decided not to worry about what I couldn’t change. She told me where I could fill out my patient info online, and I told her I had already printed off the new patient information packet from their website and filled it out.

“Well, Dr. B is in surgery today, but he has an opening tomorrow at 3:30.”

So he’s a surgeon, I thought. I wondered if he did thyroidectomies. I took the appointment and called Rusty to let him know about my plans. He again arranged to take a few hours off work so that Eleanor could nap undisturbed. I was thankful he had time off available and that he was willing to use it to help me out that way.

I noticed that I had already received two emails from Dr. B’s office—one to remind me of my appointment and one with a link to a their patient information site. There I could enter all my patient info directly into their system. It was basically all the same information I had already filled out on paper, but I went ahead and did it. Anything that would get me in faster.

I got a shipment of some new oils that afternoon. I used some of them to mix up the popular “Peaceful Child” calming blend for my kids. Is there a “Peaceful Mommy” blend? I wondered.

Tuesday morning I went to visit with my good friend J–the one who had ordered me to find a good doctor. It had been a long time since we’d had a chance to sit and talk together. We talked of many things, but conversation did eventually come around to my thyroid nodules. I confided to her that the thing I was most afraid of, if one of my nodules was cancerous, was radioactive iodine therapy. I felt like in order to keep my children safe while I was radioactive, I really would need to be in a separate house. In her usual way, she said she would come and take care of me if I went alone somewhere like the house in Florida.

“Isn’t Rusty going to go with you?” she asked, when I told her about my consultation that afternoon. “I could come over so that Eleanor could still have her nap.”

“I kind of feel like that would make it too big a deal,” I said. “Things may get to that point, where I’ll want him with me for appointments, but I don’t think we’re there yet. But I’ll tell him you offered.”

Tuesday I also got Rustic Youth Camp applications for my boys. We’ve been to RYC the past two years—it’ss something that we all look forward to. I immediately called Sarah, my sister-in-law to see if she had gotten her applications yet, or if she had heard whether she was accepted to work the camp or not. I had found out the week before that I was in as a teacher for Elliot’s class. Last year we had tried to get Sarah in to work camp so that she could bring my nieces and nephews with her. My idea of camp Nirvana was for all of us to be there—Rusty and me, my brother, Nathan, and SIL, Sarah, with all of our children. Barring the presence of our husbands, having Sarah and her kiddos join me and mine there was a close second.  I was hoping this thyroid thing wouldn’t interfere with camp.

Sarah still didn’t know if she was accepted. I went ahead and filled my kids’ applications out and got them ready to return.

At about 2:45 Rusty came in from work. I told him about J’s offer to keep the kids if he wanted to come.

“I just assumed you would tell me if you wanted me there,” he said.

“I assumed you would ask if you wanted to come,” I replied, smiling. “I just don’t want to make it into a big deal yet.” I took off to my appointment, calling J on the way to let her know I was going alone, and that I was fine.

“Well, call me when you’re done,” she said.

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